Jump to content

In Her Shoes


Christian
 Share

Recommended Posts

I have to see this movie tonight. I'd heard that it was an effective tear-jerker, aided by an excellent Shirley MacLaine performance. Not my cup o' tea, but I find myself, as of late, on a bit of a crying jag, gettin' all weepy while watching Three Wishes, or, heck, even the ending of A History of Violence!! So a little tear-jerker couldn't hurt, could it?

But then, last night, I saw a commercial for the film, with Toni Collette and Cameron Diaz talking to the camera about the film. It was dreadful, and now I don't know if I'll be able to bear the movie.

Can anyone assuage my fears?

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think I'm coming down with something...

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I must say, I'm curious to see it soley because Hanson has been so good in so many genres. LA Confidential is one of my favourite police films of all time, and IMO a better Helgelend script than Mystic River. I loved Wonder Boys, and even 8 Mile was suprisingly good.

"A director must live with the fact that his work will be called to judgment by someone who has never seen a film of Murnau's." - François Truffaut

Twitter.
Letterboxd.

Reviews and essays at Three Brothers Film.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I saw it this morning and liked it.

And, as Prins noted here, Brooke Smith has a role -- though I wouldn't call it "meaty", as he was hoping it would be. She's basically Toni Colette's best friend.

And BTW, why is Toni Colette still playing "the ugly sister"? Gee whillikers, she's a babe! Perhaps not quite as much of a babe as Janeane Garofalo in The Truth About Cats & Dogs, and perhaps not quite as much of a babe as Rachael Leigh Cook in She's All That, but really, what's with the attractive-actress-plays-girl-who-keeps-saying-she's-ugly thing!?

Note: This does not diminish my appreciation of the film, any more than rear-screen projection during the driving shots diminishes my appreciation of films made in the 1950s. It's just How Things Are Done, I know that.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And BTW, why is Toni Colette still playing "the ugly sister"?  Gee whillikers, she's a babe! 

But the movie makes the point that she's not ugly. Rather, she has a complex rooted in her childhood and teen years, when she was overweight.

I'm still making up my mind about this one. Not bad. Not great. But I feel deceived again by pre-release hype about a particular performance. This isn't Shirley MacLaine's movie -- it's Cameron Diaz's movie, first and foremost, followed closely by Toni Colette, and THEN Shirley MacLaine. The acting is good across the board, but I thought the film dragged on after a bit.

There's something about the intergenerational family aspect of this film that offset my earlier response to the sisters' behavior, but I didn't find that first aspect *all that* deep. Pretty well done, but not exceptional.

But go ahead and ask me if I cried.

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

Link to comment
Share on other sites

But go ahead and ask me if I cried.

Crybaby.

I'm crying aqain now, looking at your new avatar. wink.gif

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, you can imagine that it was Michael Bay calling you a crybaby.  'Cuz he was!

Michael Bay! Yes. I knew that I knew that face.

His movies have made me cry, for all the wrong reasons.

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just checked Metacritic and found this excerpt from Ken Tucker's review of In Her Shoes:

In Her Shoes isn

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 6 months later...

I watched this again on DVD a couple of weeks ago. It's a better movie than I gave it credit for. A simple story, but very well done.

Most critics raved about Toni Collette in this movie. She was good, but earlier I had thought Cameron Diaz showed more acting chops -- maybe because we haven't seen 'em from Diaz as often (if ever) as we have from Collette. I thought a second viewing might wisen me up, make me realize that Diaz was just a ditz playing an airhead, but no: She's really quite good in this movie. Everyone is. That's what makes it worth seeing.

Has anyone caught up with it on video?

Edited by Christian

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I did. Liked it a whole lot. Wish the ending wasn't so cheezy... feels like an executive's revision to an otherwise strong script.

And you have the audacity to call yourself an admirer of poetry?! :)

Yeah, it's cheesy, but I liked it much better the second time around.

Having two young daughters, I couldn't help but wonder how their relationship might change over time. It's a "sister thing," I guess, but anyone who has siblings can relate.

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Bayles nails the film:

There is no point in describing the plot or the characters any further, because they are formulaic. The charm lies in the execution: the screenplay, pacing, and acting, especially Diaz and Collette, who do a beautiful job of portraying the two sisters' complicated but powerful bond. ...

The best compliment I can give In Her Shoes is that it could have worked as a tragedy, in which the sisters never reconcile. Indeed, one reason why it succeeds as a comedy is that it allows tragic emotions to peek through the surface. In sum, fluff this good is hard to make and deserves at least as much respect as, say, mindless gloom.

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 10 years later...

I re-watched L.A. CONFIDENTIAL last night in memories. Still pretty much one of the best of the 90s. Like Stephen Frears in the UK, Hanson was a great workman who understood his material very well. In addition to L.A. CONFIDENTIAL I love WONDER BOYS, and still like 8 MILE a great deal (best thing Eminem has ever been involved in).

"A director must live with the fact that his work will be called to judgment by someone who has never seen a film of Murnau's." - François Truffaut

Twitter.
Letterboxd.

Reviews and essays at Three Brothers Film.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...