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kenmorefield

Michelangelo Antonioni

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Is this the director of The Passenger, with Jack Nicholson? A preview screened for this just before Good Night and Good Luck and I was really intrigued that what looked like a 70's art movie would get a theatre showing today, and even have trailers! I think it's supposed to open soon. Should I go? (assuming we're talkinga bout the same director.)

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Solishu:

According to IMDB, The Passenger was indeed the UK title of a 1975 work by Antonioni, starring Nicholson. I haven't seen it, so I can't tell you whether you should go.

But, hey, life's about trying new things, right? So go.

Peace.

Ken

Yeah, but I only have time to hit one movie a week, so I try to hit winners. I may go anyway, but I like to be confident in my decision smile.gif

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Link to my comment on Zabriskie Point (1970).

FWIW, the only other Antonioni films I can remember seeing are Beyond the Clouds (1995; co-directed with Wim Wenders) and Blow-Up (1966). I have a feeling I may have seen at least one other film, but I'm not sure -- the titles do sound familiar, and Italian films of a certain era begin to blend together in my memory.

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I have a copy of Eros, the tryptic film directed by Antonioni, Soderbergh, and Wong Kar Wai sitting here waiting to be watched.

From what I heard, poor Antonioni's chapter is the worst of the three... but we'll see.

Edit: I watched the Soderbergh and Antonioni segments just now... Antonioni's wasn't bad so much as it was cryptic. And apparently "tryptic" doesn't mean what I think it does. This is clearly an art-house film in every sense of the word. Soderbergh's segment was also pretty obscure.

Edited by theoddone33

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I saw the reissue of The Passenger over the weekend. I hadn't seen any Antononi films before, and I like his style. The big screen brought out the expansiveness of the landscape, and the setting and the pacing reminded me of Kiarostami (at least the one of his films I've seen). It was a different role for Nicholson and the emptiness of his character matched the emptiness of the desert quite well. I found the movie worked well as a morality tale, about a man discouraged about his life who tries to take on a new identity, only to have to come to terms with the consequences. I'm glad I got a chance to see this one.

The only drawback was that those wide 1970's neckties look even wider on the big screen. wink.gif

Edited by Crow

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Crow wrote:

: The only drawback was that those wide 1970's neckties look even wider on the big screen. wink.gif

Ha!

And what an AMAZING climactic shot, eh? These days we'd probably brush it aside and say they did it with the help of CGI, or whatever, but with these older films, you really are impressed by the technical feats they managed to pull off. (Although, hmmm, does being impressed by a technical feat take you "out of the movie"?)

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Yes, I loved that final continuous long take. There's something I find fascinating about the logistics of moving cameras into position and arranging a scene, as opposed to "green-screening" and CGI.

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I have a copy of Eros, the tryptic film directed by Antonioni, Soderbergh, and Wong Kar Wai sitting here waiting to be watched.

From what I heard, poor Antonioni's chapter is the worst of the three... but we'll see.

Edit: I watched the Soderbergh and Antonioni segments just now... Antonioni's wasn't bad so much as it was cryptic.  And apparently "tryptic" doesn't mean what I think it does.  This is clearly an art-house film in every sense of the word.  Soderbergh's segment was also pretty obscure.

I have to say that the Kar Wai segment was by far the best of the three. As far as I'm concerned it's up there with his best work, which for me is saying a lot, as I love basically everything he does. The Antonioni segment was pretty awful, but it did have its brief moments.

Speaking of Antonioni in general, he is definitely one of my favourite directors. L'Avventura will always be my favourite film of his, it has such an immersive atmosphere that I was left feeling completly drained the first time I saw it. I'm upset I missed The Passenger on its way through Vancouver...

Edited by jord

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