Jump to content

Ancient Color Photos


Recommended Posts

Not quite the earliest full-colour photographic process, BTW. The earliest one which worked was the Ives "Kromoskop" (or similar name) process, from the 1890s, which used beamsplitters to expose three separate negatives of a scene through red, green and blue filters. The resulting sets of three were viewed in a similar arrangement and the result was a full-colour image. I am somewhat familiar with the process as I have two stereo-sets of this process, which I bought in a street market in Paris. I still haven't figured out a way to copy and blend the images successfully. All these three-colour processes can reproduce very good colour, as the image shown indicates.

There's too much apathy in the world; but, then, who cares?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Stereocards are one of my bad habits, and have been so for many years. In theory they are stock photos for graphic design, but of course that's really an excuse. I bought rather a lot of them in the UK while I was over there in grad school, and they were still cheap. I even have a sat-print of a church in Paris by Fox Talbot himself; evidently he made a foray into the business in te 1850s for a brief time.

Colour stereos are mainly of two types: first, colour screen prints the so-called "Lithoprints", and second, hand-painted views. We do occasionally find Autochromes, but all old (before 1900) started life as monochrome. Some of the "lithoprints" are interesting, but I would rather study a good 1860-ish view of, say, Kyoto or Boston than its 1910 screen-printed equivalent.

There's too much apathy in the world; but, then, who cares?

Link to post
Share on other sites

While I obviously can't say anything about your collection without seeing the listing, I would remind you that eBay is a curious auction venue in that in many cases - and stereoviews are particularly notable for this, a I have learned the hard way - most of the price appears within the last minute. I have had to learn to snipe in self-defense, and I know that the price can easily quadrupe in the last five seconds. eBay is useful largely for seeing what is out there, but the prices are often meaningless until the auction ends. Common material, or specialized material without a specialized buyer, tends to be cheap. Interesting material is not. Civil War views, very early (<1855) views, views of places like Thailand or Japan (if they are old enough), Old West views, views of famous events (e. g. the Transcontinental Railroad), or unusual formats (e. g. stereo-daguerrotypes or -ambrotypes), are examples.

Of course, you can always produce your own, if you want to add to the colection cheaply.

.

There's too much apathy in the world; but, then, who cares?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...