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CrimsonLine

My South Beach diet

14 posts in this topic

Hello, all. I'm not a big dieter. But just before Christmas, my wife (God bless her) looked at me and said, "Honey, you're not going to like to hear this, but I need for you to seriously put your back into losing weight. You've dickered around at making small changes, but I need for you to make a six month commitment to going all out. I don't want to be a widow at 50." After a lot of discussion, we decided to try the South Beach diet.

So, just after the New Year, I started on it. It's a low-carb (only good carb) high vegetable diet. I've been doing it a month now, and after the first three days, I have not felt deprived or hungry. The receipes are great, and I'm losing weight.

Here's my progress thus far:

IPB Image

If you want encouragement in losing weight, post here, and let's talk about it. Try the South Beach diet. I like it. It's healthy (unlike Atkins). And you don't have to be hungry.

I lost thirteen pounds in this first month. Yay!

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I've lost 25 pounds using the "unhealthy" Atkins Nutritional Approach. But if you South Beach advocates want to promote low-carb eating, more power to you. It's a great way to eat.

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I just can't imagine that Atkins could be good for you.

But, I'm glad it worked for you. Are you still on it?

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I just can't imagine that Atkins could be good for you.

But, I'm glad it worked for you. Are you still on it?

I reached Phase 3 -- Pre-Maintenance -- but I cheated and never really recovered. No, I didn't put on many pounds, and any weight that was gained was subsequently lost. But I'm no good at being strict. And I got tired of counting carbs to figure out what my threshold level of carb consumption should be. Were I to figure that out, I'd still have to count carbs every day, and that's something I grew tired of long ago.

Basically, though, I have an Atkins breakfast (eggs and sausage/bacon) and an Atkins lunch (salad) nearly every day. I'm pretty good with dinners, although I have a weakness for homemade bread. I also like to have dessert. Usually it's low-carb ice cream, but even then, I probably ought to steer clear of sweets more often than I do. The low-carb substitutes are enjoyable, but they aren't helpful when you need to lose a few pounds.

The best effect of Atkins is that it helped me transition to eating mostly whole foods. That's essentially what Atkins is: a whole foods program. Anyone who says different has misunderstood Atkins or is being deliberately deceitful. The question of whether eggs and heavy cream are good for one in the long term is still up for debate. I imagine the ongoing long-term studies will largely vindicate Atkins on that score -- as have the short and mid-term studies done in the past couple of years -- but probably with enough qualifications that Atkins opponents will feel justified in their opposition.

The main point is that Atkins is a four-phase plan. Its opponents like to focus on the rigorous first phase, where carbs are minimized, even though that phase lasts all of two weeks for most people. By the third and fourth phases, the plan resembles South Beach and other low-carb/low-glycemic plans that are now in vogue, even among the medical establishment. And yet, everybody's different. Atkins acknowledges that. Some people may have a much lower threshold for carb consumption than others. It's up to each individual to figure out where their own personal tipping point is.

That the establishment has moved so far toward Atkins is really a marvel, although I've had at least one doctor warn me about Atkins while promoting South Beach -- as if there's a world of difference between the two. There's not, frankly, but it's not an argument I engage in any longer, because the two plans have so many similarities it's not worth discussing the differences.

So go forth, my friend. Congratulations on your success. Keep it up. And, if you're interested in learning more about Atkins, the company has an impressive Web site that includes an excellent learning center. You'll find a lot of helpful information on the site, even if you're not doing ANA. I can't recommend the discussion board highly enough.

Oh, and last time the doctor checked, my cholesterol level and blood lipid profile had improved since I started following ANA -- not unusual at all for those of us who follow ANA. They didn't check the cholesterol last time I requested, but said they would later in 2006, when I have my next physical scheduled. In the meantime, Sarah and I have signed up with an organic vegetable co-op; we're buying grass-fed beef from a local farmer; and we've just taken the plunge and signed to receive unpasteurized milk. I'm ambivalent about this most recent decision, but Sarah has pushed for it for a while, and we had some extra money, so we decided to try it. Friends of ours do it and are willing to split the delivery costs.

Life is good.

Edited by Christian

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Before you disappear for Lent, Crimson, would you mind providing an update?

If the news isn't good, don't let that dissuade you. I've been pigging out lately on the wrong stuff and have gained a few pounds. I need to get back on track. You?

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Weighed in yesterday morning (six weeks on the SBD) and have so far lost 16 pounds. The suit pants that I bought at my last anniversary and had tailored before Christmas are now loose - one pair so loose that it bunches under my belt - and I've bought new jeans that are two inches smaller in the waist than my last pair.

Doing great. :)

Thanks for asking!

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Outstanding!

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The big news of late is that low-Carb diets are safe. This study focused only on women, but the findings are notable.

Although Atkins, which I more or less subscribe to, has been promoting heavy vegetable consumption for as long as I

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Just stick around a while, Christian - I'm sure it'll change. :)

I'm skeptical of mainstream AND alternative medicine. Sheesh! Where do I go when I'm sick? My mom. :)

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Here we go again.

Study: Low-carb diet best for weight, cholesterol

By MIKE STOBBE (AP Medical Writer)

From Associated Press

July 16, 2008 4:12 PM EDT

ATLANTA - The Atkins diet may have proved itself after all: A low-carb diet and a Mediterranean-style regimen helped people lose more weight than a traditional low-fat diet in one of the longest and largest studies to compare the dueling weight-loss techniques.

A bigger surprise: The low-carb diet improved cholesterol more than the other two. Some critics had predicted the opposite.

"Some critics" need to take their heads out of ... uh, can't say that here. Sorry. I should be happy at this news, but honestly, it makes me angry to see the still-too-slow vindication of low-carb eating. I'm sure by the time most people read this, the medical establishment will have come out in force against the study.

Edited by Christian

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Interesting results with cholesterol levels. But I dont find the weight loss average for the two-year test (only 10.3 lbs?) to be all that impressive. Also, it appear that Atkins no too good, senor, with women and diabetics!

There are pros and cons to all of the diets, but to me the weakness of them all is in the concept of "dieting" itself, i.e. a long term regimen of strict abstinence from certain "baddy's". Never mind that the popular diets tend to disagree about what some of these baddy's actually are. In the case of the Atkins, it happens to be carbs, which in moderation can be a perfectly healthy and even wise, choice. To anyone whose tried the prospect of carb celibacy for the rest of their life, I say sincerely " best of luck!"

There are alternate ways of raising your good cholesterol levels and shedding pounds, without the prospect of traditional "dieting", calorie counting every meal, etc...

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In case anyone's interested, Atkins has an updated book on the way.

In its almost 40-year evolution, the Atkins Diet has undergone a number of modifications reflecting emerging nutritional science. The New Atkins for a New You reflects the latest thinking on diet and nutrition and introduces several significant changes that make Atkins simpler to follow, more versatile and sustainable for a lifetime of healthy eating. Simplicity, versatility and sustainability are all essential for any diet to deliver long term results.

As a follower of Atkins, I can't wait to read the new book, even though I've kept up with Atkins and its evolution on the Atkins discussion boards for years.

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even though the article states that all study participants �consumed more than 7% of calories from saturated fat, above the level recommended by the American Heart Assn.,� and that �After adjusting for various risk factors, such as smoking, scientists found no differences in cardiac risk among the groups.�

Soon, this shibboleth will fall too

The Washington Post:

For half a century, we've been told that saturated fats are bad for our hearts. That belief led to what many now consider the disastrous switch from saturated-fat-filled butter to trans-fat-filled margarine as the bread-spread of choice. It also led to the government's recommendation, through its Dietary Guidelines for Americans, that we limit saturated fat to less than 10 percent of our daily calories.

But the latest science has many experts reconsidering saturated fat. A study published in the March issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, for instance, found insufficient evidence linking saturated fat intake to cardiovascular disease or coronary heart disease. Another study in that issue suggested refined carbohydrates and being overweight are the true culprits. And they're just the latest to suggest that sat fat has gotten a bad rap.

Riding high on the wave of saturated fat's rehabilitation, the famous Atkins Diet has been revamped with an eye toward making it easier to understand and maintain. "The New Atkins for a New You" (Fireside, 2010) allows dieters to eat more vegetables than the old version did. But the diet's core concept -- that carbohydrates, not saturated fat, are what makes us fat -- remains intact.

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