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The Matrix Revolutions

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From the trailer it looks like the Smith program goes out of control to the extent that the Machine allies with Neo to remedy the problem. Now I couldn't find it in the archives but I'm pretty sure I made this prediction before Reloaded came out - that the replicating Smiths would become a strain on the system and contribute to its downfall. Not to toot my own horn...well, actually yeah. I'm tooting away. I think this is the first time I've gotten a prediction right so I'm basking in it a bit. Simple pleasures.

Anyway, I was pretty disapointed with Reloaded to the point that I almost wasn't interested in seeing Revolutions. More accurately, I wasn't looking forward to it as I had Reloaded (I sat in line for tickets at 10am to catch the first 10pm screening). However, this trailer has gotten me back on the bandwagon.

FWIW, I think one of the reasons Reloaded didn't work was because it had to play catch up. The Wachowsky bros say they always saw the Matrix as a trilogy but they didn't know if they were going to get to make all three. I believe they made a smart move by making The Matrix self-contained so that even if the other two never got made it could stand on its own. When they got the greenlight for the other two films, they had to rush and introduce characters and plot lines that wouldn't have allowd the Matrix to stand alone if they had been in that movie. That's why Reloaded doesn't hold together as well. Now that the new characters and ideas are in place, I think Revolutions will make up for Reloaded. When all is said and done, The Matrix may still be the best of the three and that would be sad because it would mean that they should have left good enough alone.

God bless,

randall

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Never-the-less, I'm going in with absolutely low expectations (in case anyone forgot, I found Reloaded less than thrilling), and maybe I'll be pleasantly surprised. Remember to take everything from AICN with a grain of salt.


"A director must live with the fact that his work will be called to judgment by someone who has never seen a film of Murnau's." - François Truffaut

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Ditto.

-s.


In an interstellar burst, I am back to save the Universe.

Filmsweep by Persona. 2013 Film Journal. IlPersona.

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Considering I never got an invite for Reloaded, I was more than a little pleased a couple days ago that I got both an invite to a daytime press screening AND a double-pass to an evening screening of Revolutions, both on November 3. Now if only I was expecting better things from the film than I am ...


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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I also didn't get an invite, but on contacting my WB contact was put on a list for a screening tonight. I'll be reporting back within 12-24 hours....


“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

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Okay, here's the poop (serious spoilers avoided through great effort of will):

Revolutions is a bang-up second film in the Matrix trilogy.

(Forget that other thing that happened six months ago.)

And now I want my third chapter.

Don't even say it. Don't even. This is a BS way to end the series. It's pointless to say that Revolutions is a big improvement on Reloaded, though it is, since the two films had different jobs to do, and neither did it. Revolutions does Reloaded's job; Reloaded didn't do anything's job; and nobody is doing Revolutions's job.

Here is the one bit of unqualified praise I have for Revolutions: There's a sci-fi siege scene that is so far beyond any other sci-fi siege scene I've ever seen that the last time a sci-fi siege scene made an impact like this was the Walker attack on the Hoth Rebel base in Empire. Yeah, I think it's in that league for revolutionary.

I can imagine that Revolutions could have been the series' Empire Strikes Back to The Matrix's Star Wars. Just combine it with the crucial bit of exposition from Reloaded, cut out all the fat from that movie, and you're all set.

As a final chapter, though, Reloaded doesn't make it into the same league as Return of the Jedi.

More later..........


“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

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From the trailer it looks like the Smith program goes out of control to the extent that the Machine allies with Neo to remedy the problem

Can't they just pull the plug on the Matrix? Or was The Arquitech (sp?) just bluffing when he said to Neo there's was a certain level of survival the machines were willing to accept? Since Neo refused to play along the prophesy, disaster was iminent anyway. Unless... based on prior especulation, what Neo considers reality is actually another secondary Matrix designed to contain The One until the real Matrix assimilates him. Both Matrixes would be infected with Smith then.

Anyway, while Reloaded wasn't satisfying at all, I really liked Neo's conversation with the Architech (sp? I'll get it right, be patient) - very brave to climax an action movie with a discussion on System Engineering theory (alas the virtual heart pumping scene that follows!).

SDG, forgive me for I envy you!

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Heck, I was hoping the whole thing would end with a Bob Newhart-esque twist. Keanu's Ted wakes up, calls his buddy Bill, and says, "Dude, I just had this totally bogus dream."

:heh_heh:

Diane

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LOL! That's way too funny DRose! Can you believe I just saw Bill & Ted's Bogus Journey yesterday?! Keanu OWNS that character... or is it the other way around, duder? :wink:

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Can you believe I just saw Bill & Ted's Bogus Journey yesterday?!

As Keanu/Ted/Neo might say: "Whoa!" 8O

Diane

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David DiCerto of Catholic News Service pipes up early with his review.

Smith, the film's virtual villain, experiences a sense of digital deja vu and snarls, \"I've seen this before.\" That sentiment may be shared by the audience throughout this final installment of Larry and Andy Wachowski's bloated cyber-noir \"Matrix\" trilogy.

All three movies consist of protracted, ultraviolent action sequences stitched together by dollops of pretentious, pseudo-philosophical dialogue and allegorical symbolism, with over-the-top, gravity-defying brawls serving as the visual centerpiece of each movie. Though the Wachowskis rein in the existential banter in this third go-round, the stylized carnage remains at full throttle. And while the franchise continues to push the envelope of technical wizardry, it's in inverse proportion to narrative and character development. The result is an overstuffed maelstrom of noise and violence, a sound and fury signifying nothing. Like the Matrix itself, the film looks substantial, but is ultimately empty of any real content.


P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

 

"Forget it, Jake. It's Funkytown."    

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I've been seeking out and sucking up all the spoilers I can find and I hate to say it but I don't think Revolutions is going to be any better than Reloaded. I never thought I'd say this but I really wish the Wachowski brothers had just left the first Matrix alone.

Blah.

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The epic conclusion to the epic trilogy ...

... in which Neo goes deep into Mordor while everyone else fights a battle elsewhere just to buy him some time. (Oops, wrong trilogy, though, well, that IS kind of what happens.)

... in which Neo goes one-to-one against his arch-nemesis yet again already, despite doing so already in the previous installments, and despite the fact that the repetition of these battles is beginning to get a little dull, just because This Time He Means Business, And You Can Tell Because There Are Choral Voices On The Soundtrack, while everyone else fights a battle elsewhere just to buy him some time. (Oops, wrong trilogy, though that IS kind of what happens. And isn't it interesting how bits of the Hammer get knocked off as it flies through tunnels, just like bits of the Millennium Falcon got knocked off?)

... in which the potential of the original Matrix is squandered on dark, dark, dark imagery and dark, dark, dark themes with very, very, very little in the way of, oh, redemptive material. In the first two films, the Matrix, while admittedly artificial, was also a bright, sunny, welcome respite from the grim and dreary 'real world'; but in the new film, pretty much EVERYthing is depressing to look at (not only Zion, but also the Matrix, because the viral Agent Smith has pretty much taken it over). QUASI-SORTA-SPOILERS We do get two shots of the beautiful sky in this film (one simulated, one not), but these do not serve as relief so much as they make us think, "Um, but what are we supposed to DO with these images? Where do we GO from here?" Basically, one of these sky-shots hints at something that remains unattainable so long as the sky is scorched, while the other ... well, it just leaves us thinking of the ending of Pleasantville, where everything LOOKS resolved but FEELS unresolved and we realize that the film is trying to have its cake and eat it too.

More comments to come (especially about the nihilistic philosophical implications of this trilogy, which are especially evident to me now that I am reading Thomas Hibbs's book on nihilism in popular culture), but for now I shall check the other comments on this thread. Oh, and since I don't think anyone else linked to it yet, here is the link to this board's Reloaded thread, which in turn links to the Reloaded thread from the mother board.

SDG wrote:

: Revolutions is a bang-up second film in the Matrix trilogy. . . . And now I

: want my third chapter.

Interesting way to put it.

: This is a BS way to end the series.

Care to flesh this out?

zahir wrote:

: Unless... based on prior especulation, what Neo considers reality is

: actually another secondary Matrix . . .

This is what I had been hoping and assuming for years, but the second film more or less killed that theory for me. In a nutshell, the first film had JUST a hint of transcendence, because Fate existed and prophecies came true and The One came back from the dead and all that. If Morpheus and crew put their level of 'reality' on a higher plane than the virtual 'reality' within the Matrix, it was only because they believed they were following the lead of an even higher 'reality'. But the second film revealed that all that talk of prophecies etc. was just another form of 'control' being imposed on them by the lower, virtual 'reality'. And the third film never really breaks out of that mold. It never, ever, ever points back to the transcendent. Instead, like the second film, it continues to give programs and machines the most personality while suggesting that human personality is itself just a network of cause-and-effect loops. (Note the discussion near the beginning of Revolutions regarding whether 'love' is a 'human emotion' or just 'a word' that describes certain kinds of connections -- connections that machines might have just as readily as humans might have them.) At one point, Agent Smith asks Neo what he is fighting for, and he says that 'truth' and 'freedom' and 'peace' and 'love' are all as illusory and artificial as the Matrix. "Why do you persist?" asks Smith, all angry-like. "Because I choose to," says Neo. And that's that. Never mind that the second film raised all sorts of doubts about the nature of choice and free will in the first place (cause-and-effect, etc.). So, in the final analysis, there is no transcendence here, just a will to power, said power being the power to make choices. And even THAT is left open to question at the end of the film.

Sigh. The next time I watch the original Matrix, I will try to forget the sequels ever happened. But it won't be easy, since they DID explain so many of the first film's mysteries (like what the Oracle was, or how the original 'One' escaped the Matrix without Zionist help, etc.).

Oh well. One trilogy down, two more to go (or three, if we count Kill Bill as a, um, two-part 'trilogy' along with Lord of the Rings and the Star Wars prequels). And who knows how long it will be until the seven-part Harry Potter series runs its course.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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That really is a shame. I actually broke down recently and watched the second film, Reloaded, and actually almost stopped it and moved on to something else when the bowling pin noise erupted during one of those damnable video game fight scenes.

All that time and money could have been spent on a trilogy worthy of representing the cyberpunk genre, a genre that is a very powerful vehicle of meaning for contemporary culture. What a shame.


"...the vivid crossing of borders between film and theology may save the film from the banality of cinema and festival business, and it may also save the church from the deep sleep of the habitual and the always known."

(Hans Werner Dannowski)

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As I was almost as unimpressed with the first film as folks seem to be with the second and third, I can't say I'm disappointed... just eager for the whole affair to be over and behind us. I'll take the storytelling, characters, and visual wonders (both dark AND beautiful, not just dark) of the Star Wars prequels any day over this stuff.


P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

 

"Forget it, Jake. It's Funkytown."    

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(M)Leary wrote:

: I actually broke down recently and watched the second film, Reloaded, and

: actually almost stopped it and moved on to something else when the bowling

: pin noise erupted during one of those damnable video game fight scenes.

Oh yeah, I noticed that too when I re-watched Reloaded last night. I don't remember noticing it the first time I saw the film, though I might have.

FWIW, there is almost no wire-fu in THIS film, until the climactic battle between Neo and Agent Smith (which brings in some of the airborne elements of the climactic battle in Dark City). In fact, I think there are no real fight scenes at all for the first hour (except for a brief gun battle outside an S&M club, which, given what we now know about the sexual predilections of a certain Wachowski brother, I found a little much), but after that it's combat footage, combat footage, combat footage as the sentinels invade Zion.

Oh, and that's something else; the fact that Revolutions takes place almost entirely OUTSIDE the Matrix also relieves the filmmakers of having to figure out what to do with the terrorist-as-hero theme that was way more prominent in the first film (and even in the second film) than in this one. Hardly anyone has time to think about the people enslaved in the pods, this time around; they're all preoccupied with Zion. The fate of the pod people gets maybe a few sentences at the end of the film, but they went by too fast for me to make heads or tails of them.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Oh! oh! oh! that reference to The English Patient reminds me, there is a death scene in here (and no I will not say whose) that goes on forEVER.

Suffice to say that someone has been mortally wounded and then proceeds to talk and talk and talk to the person who has come to his/her side to bring comfort. Heck, the person in question basically TELLS A STORY while the fate of the world hangs in the balance (and never mind that the person in question could die at any second before getting to the POINT of his/her story). There were titters at the press screening, and I suspect there will be in regular theatres, too. You really do wonder WHAT the Wachowskis were thinking.

I had forgotten about this until I read that Rolling Stone review, which makes a passing reference to The English Patient; it's not clear exactly WHAT scene Travers has in mind when he makes that reference, but it immediately reminded ME of how, when I saw this particular scene, I immediately thought back to that Seinfeld episode where Elaine sees The English Patient and yells, "Wouldja hurry up and die already!?"


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Peter T Chattaway wrote:

...some really cool, incisive comments about the lack of transcendence in the two Matrix sequels and how they undermine the hints of transcendence in the first film, which I may just have to quote and attribute to him in my review, and also some insightful quasi-sorta-spoiler comments about the sky and Pleasantville. I'm looking forward to his further comments on nihilism, because QUASI-SORTA-SPOILERS I was actually thinking the philosophical riffing takes a sort of existentialist turn, an "I am what I choose to be, I am what I make me" sort of thing.

BIG HONKING SPOILER: And how do you like Neo, the ascended master who died and rose again and doesn't have to dodge bullets, going all Cool Hand Luke and resisting Smith simply by continuing to get up while Smith beats the tar out of him?spoiler ends

SDG wrote:

:
Revolutions
is a bang-up second film in the
Matrix
trilogy. . . . And now I

: want my third chapter.

Interesting way to put it.

Hey, think about it:

    Plus, of course, Revolutions could so easily slide into the glaring middle-movie vacuum left by Reloaded. At least in Revolutions when people fight, it matters; we don't get pointless grudge matches (the Burly Brawl) and even more pointless exhibition matches (Neo vs. Seraph).

    : This is a BS way to end the series.

    Care to flesh this out?

    BIG HONKING SPOILERS: The Machines are, like, still there? Humanity hasn't been freed? Yes, the Architect says he'll free the "ones who want it," or something like that. Oh, yeah, there's a victory for mankind. Whatever happened to "a world without rules, a world without you"?

    Plus, I'm still left with a lot of questions. Like, just to pick something out of a hat, if the cycle is only repeating itself and Smith has played out that moment of triumph over the One before, why was Smith never a threat to the Machines before, and why is he one now? Or, like, just how exactly did that thing Neo and the Machines pulled on Smith work, anyway?


“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

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Here's a frenzy of first impressions (as SPOILER FREE as I can make them...)

As you probably know, I was only somewhat impressed with The Matrix. Too much ponderous talk, too much stilted action, not enough heart or real resonant direction to the piece.

And, as you probably know, I thought Reloaded was a painful bore, with even less heart, even MORE un-engaging action, and hardly any heart to speak of. Where


P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

 

"Forget it, Jake. It's Funkytown."    

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Guest Russell Lucas

Wow. Admittedly, I skimmed much of the above to avoid too much spoilage, but you've convinced me to get to a theater tonight.

I warmed a little to Reloaded upon seeing it for a second time this week. It still has stretches of inexplicability, but I appreciate some of the twists and red herrings thrown in by the Brothers, and I am quite curious to see which are resolved, which aren't and which are irrelevant.

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Wow indeed. Having just read David Edelstein's witty/sad/disappointed review at slate.msn.com/id/2090753/, I was expecting more Matrix-bashing here.

After the major disappointment of part 2, I was planning to wait and see this one on DVD. Now, I'm not so sure.


To be an artist is never to avert one's eyes.
- Akira Kurosawa

http://secularcinephile.blogspot.com

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