Jump to content

Annelise

Member
  • Content Count

    76
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by Annelise

  1. I am part of a Facebook group where we discuss radical theology. We are looking for novels with themes of doubt, redemption, etc. to discuss in Google hangouts. This should be good summer reading, not too long, but with good storytelling.
  2. Of her books, I've only read "On Beauty," which I found to be a fascinating look into marriage and our unwillingness to live without beauty.
  3. Five years ago, when I was diagnosed with breast cancer, it shook me to the core. Was I going to die? I was 51. My husband and I told our kids, my siblings, very close friends, church friends. I really did not want anyone else to know about it until I was settled with it. By that I mean knowing where I stood emotionally and with my faith. Pre-Facebook, I did have a public vehicle for broadcasting news. My weekly column, which at that point had run in the paper for 14 years. Lots of people in this community know me. They come from all different experiences. I wanted prayer, yes, but not "Oh
  4. Here's a link to Rachel's video of "Baby Doll," using a really imaginative format! Baby Doll Rachel is recording in November with Brian Beattie in Austin, Texas, whose worked with the Danielson, Sufijan Stevens, Okkervil River, Woven Hand ... once you see the video, you may agree that Beattie's style is a good fit for Rachel. Here's the IndieGoGo link that describes her project with Beattie. My link Enjoy!
  5. Franky followed "Crazy for God" with another book? More ranting about his parents, their sexuality, his sexuality? The only thing I can say is he must be doing for the money. That, and he really is nuts.
  6. That IS sad, Peter. Because when I go through periods of skepticism and doubt, somewhere inside me I am depending on Jesus to show up and show me he's here, some way that's tangible only to me. And even in saying that, the fact that we are saddened by the loss of faith in Jesus is a sort of withholding legitimacy. I do wish, when people are struggling with such questions, that they would talk about it. In my experience, they don't start talking about it until it's too late, if you know what I mean. I recently had a young man who's been friends with my kids for a long time write to me a
  7. He's right. I don't know that. The problem is...Jon has no evidence. He backs it up with what amounts to "I am sure of it!" Yeah, Ojo (or myself) cannot say he has definitely not met Christ. And that was the very point I started to question. When I realized I was going off of "a feeling I had that it was true." I also find it immensely frustrating that so many Christians think, "walking away" is so darned easy. That it is "comfortable". In spite of the fact that each time I tell a friend, it becomes harder and harder. And the exploration has been painful. And the things that peopl
  8. Good for you, Peter, for engaging him. And good questions, on both your parts. I must admit, I am more intuitive than I am intellectual, so that is how I engage with people, including my discussions with Ojo. I appreciate that he is willing NOT to answer the questions, but continue asking them. I did not read the de-conversion story, but I've heard it from him, and there may be two different versions. Like difference between C.S. Lewis's two testimonies: "Mere Christianity," the intellectual version, and "Surprised by Joy," the experiential version. I've heard Ojo's experiential de-conversion.
  9. Or what about the premises upon which all knowledge depends, but which can't be proved? Like the premise that we're not brains in vats, or otherwise in some epistomologically perverse situation? That sense experience actually corresponds in some way to objective reality? That the universe didn't just spring into existence yesterday, with physical processes and our memories and all in medias res? What about other minds? What about knowing other people? Is that a form of knowledge, or does it fail because we don't subject our friends and loved ones to double-blind tests or attempt to measure and
  10. Yeah well Ojo seems pretty sold on the whole academic emphasis on research, peer-reviewed, as he says. When I see him next week I'm certainly going to talk with him about numerous points in this essay. I guess my question is, What about other ways of knowing? Like, revelation knowledge, intuition, etc.?
  11. In his essay/blog, Ojo says this (italics mine): "There is no framework in Christian orthodoxy for treating people who have lost or suspended their faith with dignity and equality, those genuinely asking legitimate questions, trying their best to navigate the maze of suffering and elusive meaning in every human life. They are considered backslidden, rebellious, hard-hearted, in error, blind, apostate, sinful, in all kinds of language, less-than. Their faith must not have been genuine, it must have been shallow, of dubious and weak commitment, insincere, fraudulent, perhaps for illicit gain
  12. In spite of the immoral acts that take place in the book -- which horrified me, as well -- I was strangely attracted to this book. Of course the language is beautiful. I like the structure. The last chapter left me with the feeling that when we are caught up in passion, the future does not matter. The choice that we make right now to follow this passion -- whether it's moral or not, and no matter the consequences -- is a desperate act. We romanticize this at times, but no matter how we do so in our minds, consequences will come. Ah, but in that singular moment of rapture ... I was also stru
  13. Since the concert, I've actually become friends with Ojo and have had many talks with him about his beliefs. He's been gone to California for the summer, busy teaching and recording, but is due back in about a week. I am really excited about hearing how the recording went and get a preview of of the songs on the album. You see, the rest of the guys -- Gym and Sim especially -- are still very much Christians. So I also wonder what they've come up with ...
  14. This is all very nice but it's not coming to a theater near me anytime soon. How do you guys plan to see it?
  15. DA is, yes, among the very best. I had been a typical evangelical Christian until I heard DA. I could never go back to CCM -- or any other platitudes, for that matter -- after Fearful Symmetry. DA led me to the other good musicians such as Undercover. DA led me to William Blake, then to other poetry, then to English lit, now one of the passions of my life. I saw DA at a little riverfront bar here in Richmond, Va., a long time ago. The Choir opened for them. Then I saw DA at Cornerstone too. The concerts have been too few.
  16. Sim Wilson's deep dark bass is perfect for Undercover's lyrics and music. He still has a lot of energy onstage!
  17. So do you run the undercover.medelle website that's still up? It looks dated. Is the YahooGroups mailing list still active? I suspect it would not be, because they play so rarely. Last time was 4 years ago in Memphis, before that was the reunion at Cornerstone in 2000.
  18. So on Thursday I got a reminder on Facebook of a local annual music festival taking place this weekend. It's called Spaghettifest, an indie rock festival held at Natural Chimneys, in western Augusta County, Virginia. So I click on the link to check out the line-up and there's a band Undercover. "It can't be THE Undercover," I think. "But I'll check it out." Lo and behold the link takes me to Ojo Taylor's MySpace page. I find out on there that he's been teaching in the music department at JMU, where I began working a few weeks ago. He's been here in the Valley of Virginia for two years without
  19. Sounds like those "Choose your own Adventure" books that were popular when my kids were growing up!
  20. So I just today finished reading "Great Expectations." At the conclusion, my book had another ending, the one that Dickens originally had, until he was convinced to make it more happy. Has anyone else seen this? If so, what do you think? Do we always need tidy endings? Can we live with an ending that's less satisfying?
  21. I write a column for the local daily here, so I have lots of strangers wanting to be my friend. I don't want to offend them. FB allows you to put people in catagories, so I put them into a non-friend group that I created. Then, when their statuses and news feeds appear on my page, move the cursor to the right of their text and you'll see an option appear to hide people's stuff from appearing on your page. So I friend these people but then I never see them again, unless they contact me or commenti on my wall.
  22. I agree about Dickens getting side-tracked. As I read through Great Expectations, I am guilty of skimming down through the side-tracks. Does anyone else do this? Is it important that I read every word? Are the side-tracks relevant to the dimensions of the story?
  23. I never really fell for that "show about nothing" spin. If Seinfeld was about nothing, then all sitcoms are about nothing. Really. It had a great cast and was funny, but there was nothing philosophically groundbreaking about it. It was a classic situation comedy, where the characters dealt with various situations in comedic fashion from week to week.
  24. I was amazed at the First Things info on Dickens, how persistently he followed his ideals, and how seemingly well-thought-out his ministry was. As for his marriage failing, most of us have areas in our lives that do not measure up to our ideals ("or what's a heaven for?"). I guess what fascinates me most is how he lived such an active life and still had time for all that writing! What energy. Many of (us) writers believe it's our job to point the way and let others do the work. So he challenges me! Gina, is the salvation experience thread something you plan to pursue in research?
  25. Yes it is mine. Thanks so much! I'll keep my eyes open for Life of our Lord for more understanding of his faith.
×
×
  • Create New...