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Dural sacs? Nice catch--the Slate.com critics were making fun of dural sacs as the only spinal anatomy that Jack ever dealt with. (Doc: "Slipped discs? What? I can't do those!").

I think Jack is way too obvious a choice of Jacob replacement, but that doesn't mean its not him. Man of science becomes a man of faith. I still remain unconvinced that we'll find out that that Smocke is not the real bad guy. But it more and more likely every week that he is indeed bad. Good thing I just make consumer products and am not a judge or pastor or something with my apparently defective moral discernment!

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All I can say at this moment after tonight's episode,

what a brilliant thing it was for the writers and director to downplay Jin and Sun's reunion in the previous episode.

Formerly Baal_T'shuvah

"Everyone has the right to make an ass out of themselves. You just can't let the world judge you too much." - Maude 
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So...

Lapidus gets a quick death. Bummer. If he is dead, then Frank is the poster child for the Lost writer's schizophrenic approach to character development.

Edited by M. Leary

"...the vivid crossing of borders between film and theology may save the film from the banality of cinema and festival business, and it may also save the church from the deep sleep of the habitual and the always known."

(Hans Werner Dannowski)

Filmwell | Twitter

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I am holding off on Lapidus, we saw that Sayid, Sun and Jin died. Frank just disappeared after the door hit him...I am hoping for next week to start with Frank popping up a short way down the beach.

But I have to say...in the final scenes I was right there with ya, Hurley. Right there with ya.

Edited by Nezpop

"You know...not EVERY story has to be interesting." -Gibby

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According to EW, ABC and Carlton/Cuse, there were three deaths (excluding Widmore's people) in the episode. So, I think you are right.

"You know...not EVERY story has to be interesting." -Gibby

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So, I'm still processing this one. I'm not sure I can make sense of the "mechanics" of it--of Smocke needing all the Losties in one place and to kill themselves because he can't do it. So now that three of them are gone, (sniff), does that mean he needs the other three to be together and to kill themselves off? Now that some are dead and some are alive, is there some flexibility of the rules or something?

Also, I note that this was deaths number two

for both Jin and Sayid. Only death one for Sun, so she may pop back up.

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So now that three of them are gone, (sniff), does that mean he needs the other three to be together and to kill themselves off?

That is my impression as well. And Desmond is still out there as a threat because he is in tune with the dual continuity of the parallel worlds, but Locke couldn't directly kill him either.

So the great discovery of Jack is that the Man in Black is toothless when it comes to a very particular type of character, and it requires acts of faith on behalf of those characters to actually remain unharmed by the Man in Black (such as Jack's letting the dynamite fizzle out). This is a pretty nifty Kierkegaardian narrative twist.

Edited by M. Leary

"...the vivid crossing of borders between film and theology may save the film from the banality of cinema and festival business, and it may also save the church from the deep sleep of the habitual and the always known."

(Hans Werner Dannowski)

Filmwell | Twitter

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Way back at the beginning of the series (from Lostpedia):

Locke was also the first survivor to see the Monster; he was out tracking boar with Michael and Kate, when it seemed to be closing in on him. The confrontation is presented from the viewpoint of the Monster. Locke later told Jack: "I looked into the eye of this Island, and what I saw... was beautiful." ("White Rabbit") He later described the "Monster" as a "bright light" to Eko, who only replied curtly "that is not what I saw". As a result of this incident, Locke came to think of the Island as an entity unto itself with a plan for them all. This account of seeing the Monster seems to be similar to what would later be seen between Juliet and the Monster. ("Walkabout")

So, Locke saw the Monster as a beautiful bright light. Yeah, that fits.

It's the side effects that save us.
--The National, "Graceless"
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Easily the most disappointing episode of the season. Everything telegraphed, nothing surprising. I think I'd have to go back to Season 3 to find an episode as bland as this one.

Totally off subject but, as Allison Janney is "the voice" for Kaiser Permanente, I was very disappointed with her bedside manner. Thrive indeed....

Formerly Baal_T'shuvah

"Everyone has the right to make an ass out of themselves. You just can't let the world judge you too much." - Maude 
Harold and Maude
 

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Easily the most disappointing episode of the season. Everything telegraphed, nothing surprising. I think I'd have to go back to Season 3 to find an episode as bland as this one.

Totally off subject but, as Allison Janney is "the voice" for Kaiser Permanente, I was very disappointed with her bedside manner. Thrive indeed....

The most disappointing of the entire series, IMO. It managed to say so little with so much.

Honestly, the only thing of value was this: the island has been around a long, long time, and it needs a protector, and at some point, the current protector will find a new protector (perhaps when "evil" finds a loophole).

So "Mother" was a protector of some great and mighty power that did... stuff, whom she may have inherited that responsibility from, and she has now passed this protection role to Jacob. Jacob, in turn, will eventually turn this role over to his successor (which appears to be Jack). And perhaps one day Jack will turn this role over to another successor, so that the great and mighty glowing cave of... stuff... will be protected.

Now, all we need as an audience is to fill in the "why" part of this story, of which I assume we'll get in the last three episodes. Assuming that Cuse and Lindeof know the "why" themselves.

But hey, at least we got an explanation for the skeletons!

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Easily the most disappointing episode of the season. Everything telegraphed, nothing surprising. I think I'd have to go back to Season 3 to find an episode as bland as this one.

Totally off subject but, as Allison Janney is "the voice" for Kaiser Permanente, I was very disappointed with her bedside manner. Thrive indeed....

The most disappointing of the entire series, IMO. It managed to say so little with so much.

Yeah, I may be in agreement here. I went back and looked at the episode synopsis list from season 3, and could actually remember something interesting about each one.

I don't know about anyone else (or at least anybody in my age range), but everytime Allison Janney was onscreen I kept having flashbacks to this character from the Chiifon margarine commercials of the 70's...

chiffon-1.jpg

It's not nice to fool Mother Nature.

Formerly Baal_T'shuvah

"Everyone has the right to make an ass out of themselves. You just can't let the world judge you too much." - Maude 
Harold and Maude
 

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So, what I liked about this episode: (1) Titus Welliver. (2) Wow! Jack and Kate and Locke sure have aged a lot in 3 years! (3) Little references---the wells, the donkey wheel, the cave.

What I didn't like about this episode: (1) Allison Janney, (2) Mark Pellegrino except for the "I'm the only one you have left" sequence, (3) the mythologizing that felt horribly made up and arbitrary. (4) The missed opportunity to create a mythology steeped in actual myth--so many possibilities to draw from real myth without lame-o light caves and President Bartlett's press secretary. (5) Its placement in the timeline--with only a few hours left, I don't care to have 60 minutes of Jacob and Smokey's backstory, esp one that could have been done in a ten minute flash back.

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(4) The missed opportunity to create a mythology steeped in actual myth--so many possibilities to draw from real myth without lame-o light caves and President Bartlett's press secretary.

Yes. A very sad day for mythmaking on TV. In baseball, they call this a "blown save".

We laughed through much of this episode because immediately before we watched it, our daughter made up a story for us involving ice cream cones with magic buttons that exist in parallel worlds.

This episode basically had the exact narrative mechanics of this story improvised by a 3.5 year old. "So then the bad man went into the light cave and turned into black smoke. And the other man lived on the island because he loved his mommy."

Edited by M. Leary

"...the vivid crossing of borders between film and theology may save the film from the banality of cinema and festival business, and it may also save the church from the deep sleep of the habitual and the always known."

(Hans Werner Dannowski)

Filmwell | Twitter

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About halfway through the ep, my wife leaned over and said, "What? Jacob is just dumb."

Indeed, now this does lay the case for the big reverse at the end--Smocke is the good guy trying to violently right the wrongs of his crazy, murderous glowworm loving kidnapper mom.

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The Jacob/Smokey relationship can be summed up as "Mom loved you more"?

I don't think it's a good thing when the writers, who are probably striving for a much deeper emotional response, only had me thinking of the long running Smothers Brothers joke about which one Mom loved best.

(5) Its placement in the timeline--with only a few hours left, I don't care to have 60 minutes of Jacob and Smokey's backstory, esp one that could have been done in a ten minute flash back.

The placement of last nights episode absolutely destroyed the dramatic flow that the previous episode ended on. I was looking for some kind of catharsis from that. I was ready for these characters to reach some kind of a breaking point. I wasn't looking to take a break.

About halfway through the ep, my wife leaned over and said, "What? Jacob is just dumb."

Well, he is the blonde one.

Edited by Baal_T'shuvah

Formerly Baal_T'shuvah

"Everyone has the right to make an ass out of themselves. You just can't let the world judge you too much." - Maude 
Harold and Maude
 

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Yeah, I would have hung out with the unnamed boy and left Little Lord Glow-Cave to help his mommy sew stuff.

One thing that really bugged me was the donkey wheel "explanation". So this wheel is going to mix the water and light and then... what? Drop you off in Africa years in the future? Why a wheel? How will it mix water and light? I didn't see any paddles or mixing implements on it. Why is it magnetic? Why would the light over there on the island be good (as long as it is filtered by a donkey wheel), but over here on the island turn you into a terrible Smoke Monster?

I don't want everything tied up in a neat little bow, but the good kind of fantasy myth-making seems to hinge on elements and symbols that at least have an inner coherence.

But maybe they will make sense of some of these odder bits of island lore, and make my irritation moot.

(Also, the speaking Latin choice was strange. It narrows down the timeline for the island to a fairly specific time and location. Hard to imagine a boat load of pregnant Italics anywhere outside of the Mediterranean. And even outside the eastern part of the Mediterranean at that. I suppose it could have been a trading vessel or something. But otherwise, I am not sure what they were getting at with using Latin.

But here is where it gets strange. The only way a Latin speaker could have named a child "Jacob" is if they were somehow a very educated, politically connected Judean in the 1st century, or were actually a Jew from Italy in the 1st century. Otherwise, Greek would have been the default second language for someone conceivably using the name "Jacob.")

Edited by M. Leary

"...the vivid crossing of borders between film and theology may save the film from the banality of cinema and festival business, and it may also save the church from the deep sleep of the habitual and the always known."

(Hans Werner Dannowski)

Filmwell | Twitter

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One thing that really bugged me was the donkey wheel "explanation". So this wheel is going to mix the water and light and then... what? Drop you off in Africa years in the future? Why a wheel? How will it mix water and light? I didn't see any paddles or mixing implements on it. Why is it magnetic? Why would the light over there on the island be good (as long as it is filtered by a donkey wheel), but over here on the island turn you into a terrible Smoke Monster?

I don't want everything tied up in a neat little bow, but the good kind of fantasy myth-making seems to hinge on elements and symbols that at least have an inner coherence.

But maybe they will make sense of some of these odder bits of island lore, and make my irritation moot.

(Also, the speaking Latin choice was strange. It narrows down the timeline for the island to a fairly specific time and location. Hard to imagine a boat load of pregnant Italics anywhere outside of the Mediterranean. And even outside the eastern part of the Mediterranean at that. I suppose it could have been a trading vessel or something. But otherwise, I am not sure what they were getting at with using Latin.

But here is where it gets strange. The only way a Latin speaker could have named a child "Jacob" is if they were somehow a very educated, politically connected Judean in the 1st century, or were actually a Jew from Italy in the 1st century. Otherwise, Greek would have been the default second language for someone conceivably using the name "Jacob.")

M.--to me, and maybe I'm repeating myself, my issue is that they're tying up some things that I have no interest in seeing tied up. I like some of the mysteries to remain mysterious--the skeletons, for example, or how the wheel works. I don't care to know about Smokey's system of mixing light and water--what? Why even bring that up, writers?

On the other hand, there's some mysteries that I think need answered: Is this warming light really what this is all about (8O)? What is Smocke's name!? What is Mother other than a wooden actress? What is up with the temple and Egyptian statue and Greek writing and Latin speaking? Is Jacob serving a good purpose, a misguided purpose, or an evil purpose? Will Kate end up with Jack or Sawyer?! These things I must know!

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